11 Comments

  1. 1/11/2013
    Reply

    I wrestle with the meat issue – for the sake of the environment, the animal welfare and then the safety aspects of production for the workers – as a result we consume very little on a day to day basis. I have been buying a whole chicken and then making it last for 3 days – chicken noodle soup first meal, remove whole chicken and use meat in soup and then in sandwiches the next day for lunch (second meal) and then add cauliflower, baby bok choi and extra carrots to the left over soup for veg stew supper (third meal) – then if I’m feeling really thrifty I’ll boil up the bones and make some stock – perfect for cooking up farro for a healthy salad – so I guess that’s meal 4 – I’m just not there with the chicken livers – too much like a horror movie as an ingredient!

  2. 1/11/2013
    Reply

    While I am not a fan of animal abuse in any form, but I am a big fan of meat. As a hunter my husband has been very honest about the process with our kids… from hunting to cooking… so they know that what they are eating was not “born” in a grocery store. They have seen a deer butchered in our garage and know exactly why its done. We try to go local, organic, free-range as much as possible. Seeing as budget constraints wont always allow it, at the very least I try to always buy organic free-range eggs. (and since I use around 2-3 dozen a week, this is a big deal for us!) Enough about me. Great post… and way to go on supporting your local butchers!

    • 1/12/2013
      Reply

      Thanks for sharing your story, Amanda. It’s so important for us to know where our food comes from. Hunting for one’s food certainly brings that level of understanding even closer to home.

  3. Brooke, I think you hit just the right note about meat. Eat less of it, pay more for it, use all of it, and know where it lived. Meat-eating in this country has become a problem for animals, for planet, and for human health, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Here’s to chicken liver crostini!

    • 1/11/2013
      Reply

      Thanks, Tamar. That means a lot, coming from a woman who lives a life dedicated to this ideal. When cooking, I frequently think of you and your choices about eating off the land often. You inspire me!

  4. 1/11/2013
    Reply

    I, too, gave up animal in the 80’s and 90’s. It took a trip to Spain, and nearly starving for my first 3 days(it was hard to find food that didn’t include animal – this was back in ’91), to introduce meat back into my diet. I have been trying to create 3 vegetarian meals per week and when I do make chicken, beef, etc, I, like you, stretch the meals into 2, sometimes 3. So satisfying, don’t you agree! Great post, Brooke, perfect writing, as always, so thoughtful.

    • 1/12/2013
      Reply

      Thank you, Susan. I had the same experience when I traveled to France at the age of 19. Most people in the food businesses I spoke with didn’t care to comprehend the word for vegetarianism, let alone make food for people like me. :) Thank you for your supportive words! They mean the world to me!

  5. I agree that it’s important to make an informed choice. Buying meat that has been raised on pasture, without harmful chemicals actually helps the environment and the nutrients are incredibly beneficial to the body. Thank you for the tips on using the whole bird. I haven’t made it over to Lindy and Grundy, but it’s on my list of places to visit before we leave CA!

    • 1/12/2013
      Reply

      Carrie,
      when you do come to town for Lindy and Grundy be sure to give me a call! They’re in my neighborhood and I would love to see you!

  6. Whenever I make a whole chicken, I consider saving the liver, but never do because I’ve never made pate and to be honest, I was kind of afraid of doing it on my own. My grocer sells chicken livers, too, but again, fear has always gotten the best of me. This makes it seem totally doable and easy – thanks for the inspiration!

    • 1/22/2013
      Reply

      Sydney,
      I’m glad I could be of inspiration. I promise you, using the whole animal is not only good eating but good ethics. Love your site and your new video! Fun!
      Brooke

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