14 Comments

  1. You know what I love about you, Brooke? I mean, besides your warmth, charm, generosity, and good looks? That you are so focused on *other people.* So many of us (by which I mean me) are focused on ourselves — what we’re doing, what we think, what we want. But you’re making a point, and a career, of getting inside other people’s heads. Of understanding that a good experience for some is a bad experience for others. Of trying to make everyone’s experience optimal, no matter what that person’s optimal is. I can’t imagine a better person to devote a life to service, or service having a better spokesperson.

    • 2/6/2012
      Reply

      It’s taken me a while to get back to this comment, mostly because it had me floating on cloud 9 for a while. Thank you so much for your kind words. They mean the world to me. Really. xoxo,
      Brooke

  2. 1/27/2012
    Reply

    Like everything in life it’s the way you go about things that counts – even when telling a customer that their order has been messed up or they can’t have extra pickles on their bun!

  3. 1/29/2012
    Reply

    I think the moral of the story is to be clear and admit when one has made a mistake. I have been called “Sally”(from when harry met sally) and certainly like my food the way i like it. I have learned to order in a clear and respectul way and when I do “f” up and get the wrong dressing, etc., I admit my mistake and offer to pay for the “extras”. When I am nice to whomever is serving me, I get the same in return…just how life works! Great insight, Brooke. As always, Thanks!

  4. 2/3/2012
    Reply

    I have come back to this post more than once because I am having trouble expressing my thoughts (let alone expectation). But what I think I take from this is empathy soothes the soul (for all involved). Thanks GREG

    • 2/6/2012
      Reply

      Thanks, Greg. I appreciate you visiting and revisiting this post. That’s a huge compliment. Thanks for engaging with me!

  5. 3/18/2012
    Reply

    I agree with susan if you are nice to people serving you let alone bank teller, parking attendents and wait staff, they will inturn treat you better. But nowadays most people have that attitude, I pay you money, I pay your salary you are my slave or my servant. And also there are times when you can’t please some people, so its best to tell them nicely that its better they look for another restaurant or hotel that is able to accomodate their demands

  6. 4/27/2012
    Reply

    “I hope that I might some day one of these posts might help one person realize that if they can never find happiness in any business exchange, maybe it might be time to look at working on the one constant in the equation.” That is so fantastic, Brooke! Kind of like a sledgehammer covered in a pillow. :-)

    It is Occam’s Razor applied to personal happiness and satisfaction. The simplest explanation is likely the true one… and in this case it is the simplest variable that is likely related to the CAUSE of the problem…

  7. Tib
    5/3/2012
    Reply

    Someone uttered the words once that “the customer is always right”. This is the silliest statement ever uttered. So no matter what they ask for, demand if you will, how they conduct themselves, how they talk to someone, the way they conduct themselves in public they are right no matter what because they are going to pay for something? Let me assure you that customers are sometimes right, but an awful lot of the time they are just flat out wrong. I have found by holding folks accountable and refusing to give in to tantrums and intolerable jerks that business is up, complaints are down and those type of people just don’t show up near as often anymore. The rest of the customers appreciate not having to share a dining room with those that were never taught how to conduct themselves in public.

    • 5/5/2012
      Reply

      Thanks for this great comment. I’m amazed at how unconscious so many people are to their own behavior. On my best days, I try to have compassion for the worst offenders. I can only imagine that they’re in so much pain it blinds them to how intolerable and rude they are.

  8. [...] in business transactions. Unlike any ballet, however, plenty of participants are unaware they contribute to the outcome of the service dance. When one half of the partnership is belligerent, demanding, and unmindful of [...]

  9. [...] when we stop expecting big things from others and begin to ask ourselves how we can help fund the bank of our own happiness, things [...]

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